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The Student News Site of The Preuss School

The Preuss Insider

The Student News Site of The Preuss School

The Preuss Insider

Prom Season Hits the Preuss School UCSD
Stacy Rosales, School News Writer • May 15, 2024

With the 2024 Prom season around the corner, several “promposals” have occurred in the span of two weeks. This year's Prom theme will be...

Prom Season Hits the Preuss School UCSD
Stacy Rosales, School News Writer • May 15, 2024
Senior Swag Dazzles Preuss Campus
Rediet Neme, School News Writer • May 13, 2024
The Mental Health Marco mannequin welcomes people into the front office.
Testing Encourages Self-Care during Mental Health May
Rediet Neme, School News Writer • May 10, 2024
Meet the Staff
Fernanda Salazar
Fernanda Salazar
Media Editor

Clubs/organizations? MUN, Speech and Debate, TSUNAMI, and Finance club. Hobbies? Thrifting, hiking, and spending time with friends and family. Favorite Season? Winter Place you'd like...

Amy Shantal Bustos Garcia
Amy Shantal Bustos Garcia
School News Editor

Junior Clubs/organizations? → N/A Hobbies? → My hobbies are reading and crafting Favorite season? → Summer Place you'd like to visit? → I would like to visit Dubai Dream...

Clubs/organizations? Tsunami Hobbies? Art, Skateboarded Favorite Season? Fall Place you'd like to visit? Los Angeles Dream job? Therapist  

Illegal Ivory Hunting for Human Desire

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Angelina Abdelrahman
An elephant being protected at the San Diego Zoo.

The African elephant has a population of 415,000 in the world which means they are less at risk than the Asian elephant with a population of 40,000. These numbers may seem high because species like the Northern White Rhino have a population of only 2 in the wild, but in reality, the number is low and continuingly decreasing. African and Asian Elephants are an endangered species as a result of overpopulation, habitat loss, and the illegal ivory game. Elephants should not go extinct because they balance our ecosystem and provide water for the species around them by digging river beds.

The biggest issue this species faces is the illegal ivory game. Ivory is the white material that comes from elephant tusks; tusks are those long front teeth that an elephant has. Tusks are such an integral part of an elephant’s life as they use it to lift heavy objects, defend themselves, dig, and collect their food.

For hundreds of years, the ivory trade has been a huge deal. Hunters all over the world chase down an elephant, kill them, remove their tusks, and use the ivory from the tusks for porcelain, art, jewelry, and gold. People who kill these elephants sell ivory to gain hundreds of dollars giving them an incentive to participate.

Before the 1980’s, hunting for ivory was legal. After the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild, the Fauna and Flora act was passed to ban trading. It becoming illegal is explained by the World Wildlife Fund in their article “Threats to an Elephant.” Although trading ivory began to decrease, it spiked back up a few years later.

The country that has the biggest market for ivory is Asia. This makes sense because they have easier access to the Asian elephants rather than the United States or Antarctica. They also hold more value to jewelry and they use ivory in their medicine as well.

The issue I have with hunting elephants for their tusks is that they are brutally killed for human desire. These hunters chase them through their habitat, shoot them down, and carve out their teeth so that they could have nice things like jewelry and money. It is frustrating to learn about how much humans encroach on so many different species. We, as a population, cause an abundance of issues to species that are supporting the environment we live in and making sure that the ecosystem doesn’t fall apart. This ivory hunting game is just another issue to add on the long list of how human development affects endangered species

To support this endangered species you can donate to the World Wildlife Fund that takes the money and uses it to conserve elephants: https://protect.worldwildlife.org/page/52717/donate/1?en_og_source=Web_Donation&_gl=1*1us7qhd*_ga*MTYwNDAxMzY4Ny4xNjk4Mjg0NjU5*_ga_FK6M9RK84Z*MTY5ODI4NDY1OS4xLjEuMTY5ODI4NTM5Ni42MC4wLjA.*_gcl_au*MjEzNzQ3ODA5Mi4xNjk4Mjg0NjU5&_ga=2.215641758.80691600.1698284659-1604013687.1698284659

Or you can also donate through the Save the Elephants organization: Donate Page US – Save the Elephants

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